El Gran Calavera

June 25 - Luis Buñuel’s "El gran calavera" ("The Great Madcap"), Palace Theatre

Director Luis Buñuel’s El gran calavera (The Great Madcap)

1949, Ultramar Films (Mexico)
35mm, Black and White, 92 minutes
Spanish with English subtitles

Co-presented by Latin American Cinemateca of Los Angeles

Wednesday, June 25, 8pm
Palace Theatre (1911)

Host: Oscar Arce, Director of the Luis Buñuel Film Institute
Special Guest: Pablo Ferro, director/editor/producer specializing in graphic design

Luis Buñuel's second and rarely screened 1949 Mexican film is a hilarious "comedy of errors," a critique of the Mexican nouveau riche on the eve of the postwar petroleum boom. When a wealthy and hedonistic patriarch (Fernando Soler) learns of his family's desire to teach him a lesson by pretending his fortune has been lost, he decides to go a step further, launching a wild rollercoaster ride of mistaken identity, sham marriages and misfired suicides. Subversive Buñuelian touches are apparent everywhere, especially in the constant fetishization of soiled feet that cuts against the requisite glamour of the Mexican studio system. This film is Buñuel at his best!

- Oscar Arce, Director, Luis Buñuel Film Institute

La segunda y limitadamente proyectada película Mexicana de 1949 de Luis Buñuel es una "comedia de enredos", una crítica alnouveau riche en vísperas del auge pretolero posterior a la guerra.  Cuando un acaudalado y hedonista patriarca (Fernando Soler) se entera que su familia desea enseñarle una lección haciéndole creer que había perdido su fortuna, él decide adelantarse emprendiendo una desenfrenada jornada que incluye identidad equivocada, matrimonios falsos y suicidios fallidos.  Los toques subversivos Buñuelistas son aparentes en todos lados, especialmente en los constantes fetichismos del los pies sucios que contrastan con el requerido glamor del sistema Mexicano.  ¡Esta es una de las mejores películas de Buñuel!

- Translation: Cecilia Noboa-Castro

Essay about El gran calavera by María Elena de las Carreras, PhD

https://www.facebook.com/events/635443949874379/?source=1

AC
IT’S BEEN SURREAL: FILMS OF LUIS BUÑUEL
Presented by the American Cinematheque and the Luis Buñuel Film Institute.
Featuring A Surrealist Ball!

With the 1929 short “Un Chien Andalou,” Luis Buñuel (1900-1983) dove headfirst into Surrealism; the film’s mirthful logic and shocking images (most famously, a sliced eyeball) established the Spanish filmmaker’s unrivaled talent for bringing dreams and nightmares to the screen. After making “Un Chien Andalou” and its feature-length playmate, L’AGE D’OR, he fled the Spanish Civil War and eventually settled in Mexico; the iconoclastic director would frequently return to Europe to make one boundary-blowing film after another.

Fetish, religion, bourgeois society and moral degradation occupy Buñuel cinema like slyly winking serpents. As varying combinations of madonna and whore, VIRIDIANATRISTANA and Séverine fromBELLE DE JOUR are movie heroines unlike any other, and Buñuel’s gleefully ballsy treatment of taboos remains deliciously entertaining. The razor-sharp class commentary of these works is fused with the cinematic anarchy of “Andalou” in the director’s later features THE DISCREET CHARM OF THE BOURGEOISIE and THE PHANTOM OF LIBERTY, bringing Luis Buñuel’s surreal career full circle.

Series also includes “Land Without Bread” (in a new digital restoration informed by the original scenario notes), a display of production-related gems from the Buñuel Institute archive, a "Surrealist Ball" featuring appetizers from Buñuel’s personally curated home dinner menu, and other surreal surprises.

Series programmed by Gwen Deglise, Grant Moninger and John Hagelston.

SATURDAY MARCH 29TH, 2014
7PM-11PM

The LBFI and the Velaslavasay Panorama invite all you Buñuel fans for a special evening and peek into the rare Archives of Luis Buñuel. Seating is limited so please get your tickets now!!! 

http://luisbunuel.brownpapertickets.com/

POSTER

 

 

Luis Buñuel and Gabriel Figueroa: A Surreal Alliance

In 1938, André Breton, one of the founders of Surrealism, declared Mexico “the most surrealist country in the world.” Nearly 10 years later, the Spanish director and fellow group member Luis Buñuel reluctantly moved there.

 

This was in 1946, and Buñuel's famous and incendiary avant-garde films Un Chien Andalou(codirected with Salvador Dalí), L’Age d’or, and Land without Bread were far behind him. Exiled from Europe due to the Spanish Civil War and World War II, he found himself shuttling between New York and Hollywood with little to show for his troubles. But it was in Mexico where he not only resumed his filmmaking career, but cemented his place as one of cinema’s greatest auteurs.

 

Of the 20 films Buñuel shot in Mexico between 1946 and 1965, seven feature Gabriel Figueroa's cinematography. It is no coincidence that many of these are considered not just Buñuel’s best films from this period, but from his entire filmography. The director who was to create such stylishly mordant 1960s and 1970s art-house staples asBelle de Jour and The Discreet Charm of the Bourgeoisie forged his trademark style—an effortless blend of dreams, fantasies, obsessions, and outlandish behavior crisply rendered with impeccable realism and dashes of anticlerical vitriol—in such mordant, sumptuous gems as Éland The Exterminating Angel. Buñuel also looked at the desperate poverty and appalling conditions of Mexico’s poor in two classics—Los Olvidados and Nazarín.

 

We are proud to be screening these films, in addition to two oddities in the Buñuel/Figueroa canon—the improbable Southern gothic La Joven and cult favorite Simon of the Desert—as part of the museum’s ongoing film series devoted to the work of Gabriel Figueroa

October 12, 2013 | 7:30pm
 
October 18, 2013 | 7:30pm
 
October 18, 2013 | 9:10pm
 

Él

October 19, 2013 | 5:00pm
 

 

This series is curated by Bernardo Rondeau, assistant curator of film programs.

 

This series is copresented by the Academy of Motion Pictures Arts and Sciences.

 

Image: Still from Simon of the Desert, © Janus Films

 

Luis Buñuel and Gabriel Figueroa: A Surreal Alliance

In 1938, André Breton, one of the founders of Surrealism, declared Mexico “the most surrealist country in the world.” Nearly 10 years later, the Spanish director and fellow group member Luis Buñuel reluctantly moved there.

 

This was in 1946, and Buñuel's famous and incendiary avant-garde films Un Chien Andalou(codirected with Salvador Dalí), L’Age d’or, and Land without Bread were far behind him. Exiled from Europe due to the Spanish Civil War and World War II, he found himself shuttling between New York and Hollywood with little to show for his troubles. But it was in Mexico where he not only resumed his filmmaking career, but cemented his place as one of cinema’s greatest auteurs.

 

Of the 20 films Buñuel shot in Mexico between 1946 and 1965, seven feature Gabriel Figueroa's cinematography. It is no coincidence that many of these are considered not just Buñuel’s best films from this period, but from his entire filmography. The director who was to create such stylishly mordant 1960s and 1970s art-house staples asBelle de Jour and The Discreet Charm of the Bourgeoisie forged his trademark style—an effortless blend of dreams, fantasies, obsessions, and outlandish behavior crisply rendered with impeccable realism and dashes of anticlerical vitriol—in such mordant, sumptuous gems as Éland The Exterminating Angel. Buñuel also looked at the desperate poverty and appalling conditions of Mexico’s poor in two classics—Los Olvidados and Nazarín.

 

We are proud to be screening these films, in addition to two oddities in the Buñuel/Figueroa canon—the improbable Southern gothic La Joven and cult favorite Simon of the Desert—as part of the museum’s ongoing film series devoted to the work of Gabriel Figueroa

October 12, 2013 | 7:30pm
 
October 18, 2013 | 7:30pm
 
October 18, 2013 | 9:10pm
 

Él

October 19, 2013 | 5:00pm
 

 

This series is curated by Bernardo Rondeau, assistant curator of film programs.

 

This series is copresented by the Academy of Motion Pictures Arts and Sciences.

 

Image: Still from Simon of the Desert, © Janus Films

 

Under the Mexican Sky: Gabriel Figueroa—Art and Film

Art of the Americas Building, Level 2
September 22, 2013–February 2, 2014
 

From the early 1930s through the early 1980s, the Mexican cinematographer Gabriel Figueroa (1907–1997) helped forge an evocative and enduring image of Mexico, its history, its landscape and its people. Among the most important cinematographers of the so-called Golden Age of Mexican Cinema, Figueroa worked with leading directors from Mexico, the United States and Europe—traversing a wide range of genres while maintaining his distinctive and vivid visual style. In the 1930s, Figueroa joined a vibrant context of photographers, filmmakers, painters, printmakers and muralists—including Diego Rivera, Jose Clemente Orozco, Edward Weston and Manuel Alvarez Bravo—who sought to convey the symbolic significance of the country’s transformation after the scarring battles of the Mexican Revolution of the 1910s. Later, he adapted his approach to the very different sensibilities of directors Luis Buñuel and John Huston, among others. Figueroa spoke of creating una imágen méxicana. His films are an essential part of the network of appropriations, exchanges and reinterpretations that formed Mexican visual identity and visual culture in the mid-twentieth century and beyond.

The exhibition features film clips, paintings, photographs, posters and documents many of which are drawn from Figueroa's archive and the Televisa Foundation collections. In addition, the exhibition will include works by contemporary artists and filmmakers that draw from the vast inventory of distinctly Mexican imagery associated with Figueroa’s cinematography.

See this exhibition for free: become a member.

Under the Mexican Sky: Gabriel Figueroa—Art and Film was organized by the Televisa Foundation.

In Los Angeles, the exhibition is co-presented by the Los Angeles County Museum of Art and the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences and is generously supported by the Televisa Foundation, the Consejo Nacional para la Cultura y las Artes (Conaculta), and the Instituto Nacional de Bellas Artes (INBA).

 

Bunuel Double feature this Friday at the Egyptian Theatre:

DOUBLE FEATURE

Bunuel-obeject

 

COME SUPPORT THE AMERICAN CINEMATHEQUE!!!!!!

The Luis Buñuel Film Institute aims to form the vital and innovative arena for the promotion of the work of Luis Buñuel, and a seminal resource for the development of new research, knowledge and scholarship on his life and work, extending across his body of films and writings.